Join us and get access to hundreds of tutorials and a community of expert Pythonistas.

Unlock This Lesson

This lesson is for members only. Join us and get access to hundreds of tutorials and a community of expert Pythonistas.

Unlock This Lesson

Hint: You can adjust the default video playback speed in your account settings.
Hint: You can set the default subtitles language in your account settings.
Sorry! Looks like there’s an issue with video playback 🙁 This might be due to a temporary outage or because of a configuration issue with your browser. Please see our video player troubleshooting guide to resolve the issue.

Converting Code From Python 2 to 3: Recap

Give Feedback

This is the last video of the course providing you a quick summary of what you have learned as well as a few tips for migration projects.

Gabriel on March 15, 2019

I really don’t think the advanced tag applies to this series.

pa1 on Sept. 8, 2019

You mentioned about using six to convert py2 code to py3 and still keep it compatible with py2. But you also talked about and used 2to3 tool to do this. Are six and 2to3 different? if yes when to use six vs 2to3? What are the pros and cons of these tools?

Florian Dahlitz RP Team on Sept. 18, 2019

Hi pa1! The idea behind 2to3 is, to convert your Python 2 code to Python 3 (as the name suggests) by applying certain fixers such as making the print-statement to a print function. In contrast to that six is a library to help you make your code compatible (!) with Python 2 and 3.

Here are two hopefully helpful links:

Cynthia G Mills on June 25, 2020

The elephant in the room that you don’t mention is managing the iteration routines over dictionaries, e.g. viewitems, iteritems, … I watched this course to learn how best to approach this, since I make heavy use of dictionaries.

Become a Member to join the conversation.