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Duck Typing

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In this lesson, you’ll learn about duck typing. This term comes from the saying “If it walks like a duck, and it quacks like a duck, then it must be a duck.” (There are other variations).

Duck typing is a concept related to dynamic typing, where the type or the class of an object is less important than the methods it defines. When you use duck typing, you do not check types at all. Instead, you check for the presence of a given method or attribute.

For example, you can call len() on any Python object that defines a .__len__() method:

>>>
>>> class TheHobbit:
...     def __len__(self):
...         return 95022
...
...
>>> the_hobbit = TheHobbit()

>>> the_hobbit
<__main__.TheHobbit object at 0x108deeef0>

>>> len(the_hobbit)
95022

>>> my_str = "Hello World"
>>> my_list = [34, 54, 65, 78]
>>> my_dict = {"one": 123, "two": 456, "three": 789}

>>> len(my_str)
11
>>> len(my_list)
4
>>> len(my_dict)
3
>>> len(the_hobbit)
95022

>>> my_int = 7
>>> my_float = 42.3

>>> len(my_int)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
    len(my_int)
TypeError: object of type 'int' has no len()

>>> len(my_float)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
    len(my_float)
TypeError: object of type 'float' has no len()

In order for you to call len(obj), the only real constraint on obj is that it must define a .__len__() method. Otherwise, the object can be of types as different as str, list, dict, or TheHobbit.

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