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The Figures Behind the Scenes

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Each time you call plt.subplots() or the less frequently used plt.figure(), which creates a figure with no axes, you’re creating a new figure object that matplotlib sneakily keeps around in the background.

Earlier, you saw the concept of a current figure and current axes. By default, these are the most recently created figure and axes objects in memory. Start by using subplots() to grab your figure and axes objects:

>>>
>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()

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